Discussion:
Is Crayfish a Fish - EA Licence
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CS
2008-07-08 06:12:52 UTC
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I'm trapping american crayfish and do I need a licence?? The EA
website indicates that a licence is needed for "Anyone aged 12 years
or over who fishes for salmon, trout, freshwater fish or eels in
England and Wales is required by law to have an Environment Agency Rod
Fishing Licence."

Well, a crayfish is a shellfish, or more correctly a crustacean, and
as far as I am aware it is not a fish. I am also not using a rod, but
a trap. So in terms of plain english and definitions I do not require
a licence.

TVMIA
Ken Ward
2008-07-08 07:50:45 UTC
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Post by CS
I'm trapping american crayfish and do I need a licence?? The EA
website indicates that a licence is needed for "Anyone aged 12 years
or over who fishes for salmon, trout, freshwater fish or eels in
England and Wales is required by law to have an Environment Agency Rod
Fishing Licence."
Well, a crayfish is a shellfish, or more correctly a crustacean, and
as far as I am aware it is not a fish. I am also not using a rod, but
a trap. So in terms of plain english and definitions I do not require
a licence.
I think you will find that a "Trap" could be deemed to be an "Illegal
instument" if used unlicenced.
You need to read the Full conditions from the EA and not the Rod Licence
regulations.

Bye Laws are different from one region to another.

KW
Derek Moody
2008-07-08 08:18:28 UTC
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Post by CS
I'm trapping american crayfish and do I need a licence?? The EA
In areas with signals only permits are free - but you do have to have the
permit.

http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/aboutus/1105530/1086477/1086480/1087835/1087809/

Provides contact information - (phone) for local info.

Cheerio,
--
Fishing: http://www.fishing.casterbridge.net/
Writing: http://www.author.casterbridge.net/derek-moody/
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CS
2008-07-12 19:11:58 UTC
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Pulling signal crayfish out the size of small lobsters. Amazing.
Derek Moody
2008-08-15 23:05:02 UTC
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Post by CS
Pulling signal crayfish out the size of small lobsters. Amazing.
I've not been following any research but they must be having a significant
effect on fish stocks - I wonder if they're anything to do with the eel
situation.

Consider: a large, tough, prolific, scavenger has to clear up a lot of what
would otherwise have been food for bottom feeding fish, they must take a lot
of fish spawn and might even be predators in their own right.

Boil 'em for five minutes and serve with dill sauce.

Cheerio,
--
Fishing: http://www.fishing.casterbridge.net/
Writing: http://www.author.casterbridge.net/derek-moody/
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Gandalf
2008-08-17 11:31:09 UTC
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Don't like dill, will salad cream do.<VBG>

I thought signal crays were known to predate on small fry and young eels
have to be easy pickings for such a set of claws I would have thought.
--
Gandalf
In article
Post by CS
Pulling signal crayfish out the size of small lobsters. Amazing.
I've not been following any research but they must be having a significant
effect on fish stocks - I wonder if they're anything to do with the eel
situation.
Consider: a large, tough, prolific, scavenger has to clear up a lot of what
would otherwise have been food for bottom feeding fish, they must take a lot
of fish spawn and might even be predators in their own right.
Boil 'em for five minutes and serve with dill sauce.
Cheerio,
--
Fishing: http://www.fishing.casterbridge.net/
Writing: http://www.author.casterbridge.net/derek-moody/
http://www.fishing.casterbridge.net/urfg/
Derek Moody
2008-08-17 11:51:29 UTC
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Post by Gandalf
Don't like dill, will salad cream do.<VBG>
OK, a generous squeeze of lemon and brown bread and butter - thinly sliced
cucumber is optional extra.
Post by Gandalf
I thought signal crays were known to predate on small fry and young eels
have to be easy pickings for such a set of claws I would have thought.
Yes. What I haven't seen is any sort of survey of the effect of a
population of signals on the rest of the ecosystem. Do they just cream off
a surplus or is there a significant shift?

Cheerio,
--
Fishing: http://www.fishing.casterbridge.net/
Writing: http://www.author.casterbridge.net/derek-moody/
uk.rec.fishing.game Badge Page:
http://www.fishing.casterbridge.net/urfg/
Gandalf
2008-08-17 22:37:24 UTC
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I have not heard of any studies on the effect of this but many prominent
anglers seem to suggest the increase in large fish on rivers is down to them
eating the signals. They have been there for awhile so you would think the
Rivers Authority would have done some studies.

Like the idea of the lemon but brown bread kills the old tummy and cucumber
repeats so I am guessing a good crusty bit of break and an ice cold cider,
no finesse me.<VBG>
--
Gandalf
Post by Gandalf
Don't like dill, will salad cream do.<VBG>
OK, a generous squeeze of lemon and brown bread and butter - thinly sliced
cucumber is optional extra.
Post by Gandalf
I thought signal crays were known to predate on small fry and young eels
have to be easy pickings for such a set of claws I would have thought.
Yes. What I haven't seen is any sort of survey of the effect of a
population of signals on the rest of the ecosystem. Do they just cream off
a surplus or is there a significant shift?
Cheerio,
--
Fishing: http://www.fishing.casterbridge.net/
Writing: http://www.author.casterbridge.net/derek-moody/
http://www.fishing.casterbridge.net/urfg/
Derek Moody
2008-08-18 00:38:10 UTC
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Post by Gandalf
I have not heard of any studies on the effect of this but many prominent
anglers seem to suggest the increase in large fish on rivers is down to them
eating the signals.
It might equally be the effect of a large percentage of the young stock
being eaten and so there is little competition for the (dwindling) food
resource - those adults that do survive therefore grow well.

This is all very well until there are a few hard years in a row when the
populations might be distorted. For eg: How many small tench are surviving?
What about bream?

We know that eels are already under pressure - will this add to the problem?
Post by Gandalf
They have been there for awhile so you would think the
Rivers Authority would have done some studies.
I'm sure someone has looked at it but so far (OK I haven't tried very hard)
I've seen no hard figures.
Post by Gandalf
Like the idea of the lemon but brown bread kills the old tummy and cucumber
repeats so I am guessing a good crusty bit of break and an ice cold cider,
no finesse me.<VBG>
I'll take my cider at cellar temperature thanks - but use the signals
anywhere a tv cook would use tiger prawns or langoustine** and you won't go
far wrong.

Cheerio,

** Just double the portions and pile the plate up anyhow ;-)
--
Fishing: http://www.fishing.casterbridge.net/
Writing: http://www.author.casterbridge.net/derek-moody/
uk.rec.fishing.game Badge Page:
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Jon
2008-08-19 10:08:35 UTC
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Derek Moody wrote...
Post by Derek Moody
Post by Gandalf
I have not heard of any studies on the effect of this but many prominent
anglers seem to suggest the increase in large fish on rivers is down to them
eating the signals.
It might equally be the effect of a large percentage of the young stock
being eaten and so there is little competition for the (dwindling) food
resource - those adults that do survive therefore grow well.
This is all very well until there are a few hard years in a row when the
populations might be distorted. For eg: How many small tench are surviving?
What about bream?
We know that eels are already under pressure - will this add to the problem?
Post by Gandalf
They have been there for awhile so you would think the
Rivers Authority would have done some studies.
I'm sure someone has looked at it but so far (OK I haven't tried very hard)
I've seen no hard figures.
Post by Gandalf
Like the idea of the lemon but brown bread kills the old tummy and cucumber
repeats so I am guessing a good crusty bit of break and an ice cold cider,
no finesse me.<VBG>
I'll take my cider at cellar temperature thanks - but use the signals
anywhere a tv cook would use tiger prawns or langoustine** and you won't go
far wrong.
http://www.environment-
agency.gov.uk/subjects/fish/246986/342184/1205879/?lang=_e


American signal crayfish

American crayfish in UK streams and rivers are threatening our
indigenous crayfish. Where have they come from and how do they threaten
their native cousins?
Richard
2008-08-20 07:48:14 UTC
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Post by Jon
Derek Moody wrote...
Post by Derek Moody
Post by Gandalf
I have not heard of any studies on the effect of this but many prominent
anglers seem to suggest the increase in large fish on rivers is down to them
eating the signals.
It might equally be the effect of a large percentage of the young stock
being eaten and so there is little competition for the (dwindling) food
resource - those adults that do survive therefore grow well.
This is all very well until there are a few hard years in a row when the
populations might be distorted. For eg: How many small tench are surviving?
What about bream?
We know that eels are already under pressure - will this add to the problem?
Post by Gandalf
They have been there for awhile so you would think the
Rivers Authority would have done some studies.
I'm sure someone has looked at it but so far (OK I haven't tried very hard)
I've seen no hard figures.
Post by Gandalf
Like the idea of the lemon but brown bread kills the old tummy and cucumber
repeats so I am guessing a good crusty bit of break and an ice cold cider,
no finesse me.<VBG>
I'll take my cider at cellar temperature thanks - but use the signals
anywhere a tv cook would use tiger prawns or langoustine** and you won't go
far wrong.
http://www.environment-
agency.gov.uk/subjects/fish/246986/342184/1205879/?lang=_e
American signal crayfish
American crayfish in UK streams and rivers are threatening our
indigenous crayfish. Where have they come from and how do they threaten
their native cousins?
http://www.defra.gov.uk/fish/freshwater/crayfish.htm

Richard
Derek Moody
2008-08-20 16:09:58 UTC
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Post by Richard
http://www.defra.gov.uk/fish/freshwater/crayfish.htm
A useful page, ta. I'd like to see some figures though - some quantitative
survey(s).

Cheerio,
--
Fishing: http://www.fishing.casterbridge.net/
Writing: http://www.author.casterbridge.net/derek-moody/
uk.rec.fishing.game Badge Page:
http://www.fishing.casterbridge.net/urfg/
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